MONASH UNIVERSITY MONASH UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTER SCIENCE and DIGITAL SYSTEMS
HONOURS 2001

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/hons/

1  General Matters

Welcome to the Computer Science Honours, and Digital Systems Honours programmes! We hope that you will have a successful and enjoyable year in your course. If you are having any problems related to this course, or if you need course-related or general advice you should talk to the co-ordinator. They are:

Other people you may need to deal with include

Library Orientation

There will be a library orientation session, on Wednesday, Feb. 28, 11am - 1pm. The focus of this session will be on using the library as a research resource and will include a hands-on session with electronic databases. Please meet Ms Sara Miranda at the Information Desk, Hargrave-Andrew Library; the session will be conducted in the IT training room.

2  Course structure

Each Honours student must undertake coursework units and a substantial individual research project which together add up to 48 points.

CSE417 Communication and Research Skills

All students must take the compulsory unit, CSE417 Communication and Research Skills. This unit is intended to improve the oral and written presentation skills of students and to teach skills required for the critical analysis of research. CSE417 will take place over both semesters. You will receive a separate handout for this unit in your first class: 11-12noon, Thursday 1 March, Room 135, Blg 26.

Seminars

School seminars are held regularly throughout the year (typically once a week). We consider these to be part of CSE417 Communication and Research Skills. You are require to attend at least 5 seminars each semester and fill out a seminar evaluation sheet (available in separate handout) for each seminar you attend and submit it immediately after the seminar to the Honours coordinator. Also, attendance at the interim and end of year honours project symposia is mandatory.

Coursework Units

The units offered this year to Computer Science and Digital Systems students are detailed in the appendix and are on the Web. These subjects either have CSE400 numbers, in which case they are exclusive Honours units, or they have shared codes (CSE4XXX, CSE5XXX) which means that they are also part of other courses.

You are allowed to select a single third year or fourth year subject or even a subject from another school or faculty. However, you must obtain individual approval from the co-ordinator for such a choice.

A total of 28 coursework points must be taken. These include the compulsory CSE417 Communication and Research Skills subject which counts for 4 points. The remaining units must be chosen such that they consitute a minimum of 24 points. Please note that some units count for 4 points, others for 6 points. Most subjects have 2 hours of lectures per week, but some of the 6 point subjects have 3 hours of lectures. This does not mean that the total workload of a 6-point subject with only 2 lecture hours is lower, because this will be balanced by, e.g., more reading or more assignments.

You can combine 4-point units and 6-point units, but you cannot collect more than 12 points from subjects with shared codes of the groups CSE 48XX and CSE 58XX. Additionally, you must not collect more than 6 points from third year, fourth year and external units from other schools or faculties. A third year subject will typically count as a 4 point unit in the honours program.

The units offered this year are detailed in the appendix and are on the Web. Units typically comprise 36 or 24 hours of lectures over 12 weeks and include some practical work. Most units will either start in Semester 1 (26th February) or in Semester 2 (16th July). However, individual units may start later or may have breaks in the middle because of commitments of the staff involved. Assessment for each course may be based on assignments, an examination, or both, and will be clearly specified by the lecturer at the start of the unit.

Unit Selection

By the end of the second week of semester you must complete a Honours Unit Selection Form, identifying the units you wish to take in addition to CSE417 Communication and Research Skills. This form comes in two flavours:

Be careful to choose the appropriate form. The completed form should be handed in to the Enquiries Office by the end of 2nd week of semester (Friday March 9th). After you have submitted your selection form, it will be checked and approved by the co-ordinator. You will be notified if there are any problems - watch the notice board. The form is attached. You should not directly enrol in non CSE400 units, but must enrol through the School.

You must formally notify your intention to change a subject by sending an email to Karen Fenwick (karen@csse.monash.edu.au). You will receive email approving (or not) the change. All changes must be approved. Should you fail to formally notify the School of subject changes or fail to get approval, marks for the original subjects will be used to calculate your course work component.

Final Grade

The final grade (H1, H2A, H2B, H3 or fail) for the Honours course is computed by combining the project marks and coursework marks weighted in accordance with their point value. The coursework mark includes the CSE417 (Communication and Research Skills) unit marks and the best possible combination of units that constitute 24 points. At most one unit that is not on the list of CSE400 and CSE4XXX and CSE5XXX units may be counted for the mark. In summary:

24 points of units plus CSE417 28 points
Honours thesis 20 points
Total 48 points

Prizes

The name of the Dux of the year is inscribed on the Honour's board in the School of Computer Science and Software Engineering (Clayton). Two prizes of A$500 each have generously been donated by Open Software Associates Ltd. One is awarded to the student with the best project and another to the student with the best coursework marks.

3  Projects

The core of the Honours programme is an individual research project which is worth 20 points. Two important parts of the project work are written and verbal presentations of the project.

For many Honours students the Honours project is unlike anything they have done before. Sometimes it's hard to know what you should be doing and when and how you should be doing it. Here are some general guidelines. However, they are not applicable to all projects and your supervisor will be able to - and should - provide more project specific guidelines and goals.

The Research Project is designed to take about 500 hours for the average student. A Research Project may be concerned with theory, program development, hardware development, evaluating and improving on a new technique, analysing performance - in fact anything associated with computing which involves a reasonable amount of intellectual and practical effort. The student is expected to read the relevant literature and carefully analyse the problem posed, to formulate a solution or proposals for a solution, and where appropriate, to implement and prove, evaluate or test the validity of their results and proposals. The project solution will usually require creative and original thinking. Typically, a project is designed for a problem in some area associated with a research programme being carried out by a member of staff. The Research Project involves substantial mentoring by a staff member, and is designed to teach research skills. These skills are particularly important if the student wishes to undertake a post-graduate research degree.

Project Registration Procedure

A list of projects will be handed out separately and is also available on the Web. It contains a brief outline of each project and the name of the supervisor. Supervisors can individually provide further information about a project and are willing to discuss what is involved.

If you have a project in mind that you would like to do you are encouraged to approach a relevant member of the academic staff to suggest this project. Most supervisors appreciate this sort of initiative and will be happy to supervise such a project if it is well-defined and in their area of research. However, students do not have a right to insist on their own project, and in the great majority of cases they will do projects from the published list. Students may not always be able to do the project of their choice, either due to the popularity of a project or because each staff member is restricted to supervising a maximum of three projects.

Project registration and allocation will be done in the first week of Semester 1. Please fill in the Project Allocation Form which is attached. Give at least 6 preferences in ranked order. Your preferences should be supervised by at least 3 different supervisors. Hand your completed form in to the Enquiries Office by Friday 2 March, 12noon. The Honours coordinator will announce project allocations as soon as possible after this time by email.

Evaluation of Projects

The School takes the evaluation of projects very seriously, as they are a substantial contribution to the student's final mark. The following are part of the project assessment.

NOTE: Some of these items are part of the assessment for CSE417 Communication and Research Skills; see CSE417 handout for details of assessment weightings.

  1. A research proposal is due by 12 noon Thursday 26 April. By this time the student is expected to have read sufficient literature to be able to form a fairly good plan of how to attack the chosen problem. Thus, this report typically contains a description of the project and plans for the solution of the associated problems. The report should show evidence of the thinking the student has done about the project, and possibly some initial experiments which indicate that the suggested approach seems plausible. A time-table accompanies the said plans. A submission must be made by the due date and handed in to the Enquiries Office. Re-submission will be requested for unsatisfactory proposal.

  2. On Thursday May 31, a symposium will be organised which all academic staff and Honours students will attend. Each student will be given approximately 10 minutes to describe their project and what they have done on the project so far. A short question and comment time will follow. This seminar is intended to give experience in such presentations and to provide for input from other academic staff concerning your plan and approaches.

  3. A first draft of a Literature Review is due by 12 noon Thursday 7th of June. The final literature review is due on Thursday 26th of July.

  4. A first draft of the thesis is due Friday 5 October, 12 noon, so that the supervisor can provide comments before the final report is submitted. (You should of course get drafts to your supervisors before this date.)

  5. The final report is due by 12 noon, 6th November, Melbourne Cup Day. This is followed by a School Cup Day gathering to which Honours students are invited. The final report provides the basis of the project assessment and is examined by at least two staff members, one of whom is usually the supervisor of the project in question. It may be appropriate to demonstrate your project to your examiners.

    Only under exceptional circumstances will an extension of the thesis submission deadline be granted by the Honours coordinator.

  6. The final talk will during the week of October 22-26th (exact dates still to be arranged). You will be informed in CSE417 as to the required length of presentation. A question and comment time of five minutes will follow. Examiners take the seminar presentation and fielding of questions into account when assessing a project. It is compulsory for you to attend all final talks.

  7. The poster presentation session will take place at the end of semester, at a time still to be arranged. You must produce a poster on your project and attend this poster session. As in recent years, it is intended to present selected posters to representatives from local and international companies and research organisations at the ``Industry Day''. Use this chance to impress your potential employers!

After the second talk, the staff meet and each project is discussed individually. The final grade is determined from the marks assigned by the two examiners, although their recommendations are sometimes changed by consensus to ensure that all projects are fairly marked. The examiners take into account each of the above, with emphasis given to the final report. If the two examiners' marks differ significantly, then a third or even fourth detailed examination may be called for. The final grades for the project and overall grade for the year are determined at a staff meeting after all components of the assessment have been marked. An external assessor will also independently examine selected projects and will be present at the staff meeting so as to ensure objective marking.

Most projects have a significant practical content, involving hardware and/or software development. It is crucial that by the time of the research proposal you have reached some agreement with your supervisor about the extent of this practical work. It is equally important that by the time you hand in your final report this practical work has been completed, as you are likely to lose marks for incomplete work. Your practical work will be judged for its quality in at least the following categories;

Some projects will have a large theoretical component. Theoretical work will be judged for its quality in at least the following categories;

Guidelines for Carrying Out the Project

For most students, the hardest part of the Honours year is managing their time so as to work consistently on the project throughout the year amongst the short-term pressures of course work assignments and exams. Start your project early (that is, in March) and keep at it. Your project is worth almost half of your final marks for the year! Do not get bogged down spending a disproportionate amount of time on small course work assignments which are worth relatively little in your overall mark.

A rough timetable for your project should be:

The following hints may help your research and time management:

4  Guidelines for the Final Report

The project report must be typed on A4 paper. It should be no more than 30 pages long, excluding the literature review, appendices and bibliography. Access to the laser printers will be provided. You should realise this is a privilege. Drafts must be kept to a minimum; use the postscript previewers or WYSIWYG packages on the Macintosh/PC computers. A quota of pages produced on the laser printers may be imposed for each Honours student. Three copies of the report must be submitted. Photocopying of the second copy can be arranged through the Enquiries Office.

It is important that the report contain a complete account of the work done. In general, the report should contain:

With scientific writing, organisation and structure is half of the task, and so considerable effort should be invested in detailed outlines before any text is composed. Changing outlines is quick and easy; rewriting text is time consuming.

The supervisor will advise on all aspects of the preparation of the thesis, and will check through the draft at least once if received by the first draft deadline, but the student is reminded that it is not the supervisor's responsibility to write or re-write all or part of the work. Refer (with caution) to existing Honours theses of the School for an indication of the required format. Note that as a student you are being examined not only on research and organisation ability, but also on your ability to present and defend ideas. Conformity to conventions, both scientific and grammatical, is important. It is vital that the thesis contains a complete account of the work you have done: Make clear what your achievements are and how much time you spent on your project. Your second reader will sometimes know your project only superficially, and your thesis is the best way for him or her to get to know it better.

A reasonable thesis structure is as follows:

If you choose to use LaTeX, a suitable style file will be provided. The recommended font size is 11 point. Essential footnotes are normally placed at the foot of the page to which they refer. Number pages consecutively, including pages carrying diagrams, photographs, maps, etc. Diagrams should be computer drawn and included as postscript/latex graphic/etc files directly into the document, or at least photocopied onto the particular page. Photographs must be mounted with dry mounting tissue or spray adhesive, and where possible copied photographically as a whole page and included in the thesis in the normal manner. References must be referred to in the text, and listed in the bibliography following a standard and consistent format.

The ``Declaration of Originality'' must be on a separate page and contain the following wording:

I < student name > declare that this thesis is my own work and has not been submitted in any form for another degree or diploma at any university or other institute of tertiary education. Information derived from the published and unpublished work of others has been acknowledged in the text and a list of references is given in the bibliography.

-------
(student signature)

-------
Date (day, month and year)

The Abstract on a separate page should not exceed 500 words.

Appendices are not intended as a means to 'pad-out' a sparse thesis with peripheral material, or to circumvent the page limit in an 'obese' thesis. They serve as a repository for useful products of the research (e.g., documentation including installation of a program and a detailed example run of the program) which are not an integral part of the main body of the thesis. Where the raw data of a thesis cannot be extracted directly from the test figures and tables, it is essential that they be tabulated in an appendix. In short, appendices preserve valuable information which might otherwise be lost, but the thesis should be able to stand without them. Long, detailed program code should be put on a CD ROM or floppy disk in the back of the thesis, rather than listed in appendices.

In addition, student are expected to leave a copy of their thesis available for online viewing (either html or postscript).

Guidelines for the Research Proposal and Literature Review will be in the handout for CSE417 Research and Communication Skills, to be given out on Thursday March 1st, 11-12am, Room 135 (Blg 26).

5  Postgraduate Study

All Honours students should consider their potential and options for continuing into some form of research study. The Honours year can be seen against a number of backgrounds: employment advantages over 3 year degrees, ability to gather additional course material, even as a procrastination over career choices! But the original purpose of the Honours year is to provide training for students who wish to continue on to postgraduate study. This is still one of the main objectives of the degree, and an understanding of this will doubtless help you to make sense of much of the course work you do get. If you are interested in postgraduate study, make your interests and desires known to your lecturers and project supervisor. They will be only to happy to help you gain additional insights and perspectives on what is to them a fascinating field of study. Not only will they enjoy your interest, but you may find it gives you the additional impetus to do well in what may be your final year of formal examinations. Good luck in those examinations!

Scholarships are available to support you. They start at about $15,000 per annum (tax-free), and can be supplemented to higher figures in particular circumstances. There are a number of different types of scholarship, the main ones (roughly in order of prestige and amount) being:

Students intending to apply for scholarships are urged totalk to the Postgraduate Coordinator (Dr. Henry Wu). There are a number of options available to those who miss out on the very competitive APA and MGS awards. Competition for all scholarships is fierce. Usually only students with an H1 grade for Honours are successful in obtaining scholarships.

Further announcements about Postgraduate Study will be made later in the year. Also see the Postgraduate Handbook on the School WWW entry.

6  Appendix: Subjects offered in 2001

6.1  CSE 417 Communication and Research Skills

Harriet Searcy and other lecturers,
co-ordinated by: Peter Granville, Bernd Meyer, and Andrew Paplinski

This unit is compulsory. It covers three main areas: research skills; technical writing; and technical presentations. You will learn to: research, deliver and evaluate professional technical presentations; write a literature review; structure and write a thesis.

6.2  CSE 446 Advanced Programming Concepts

Trevor Dix, Kim Marriott and Bernd Meyer

Prohibitions: CSE 433 and CSE 444.

This unit covers selected topics in advanced programming languages which do not readily fit into the traditional classification of procedural/functional/logical/object-oriented paradigms.

The unit consists of two parts. The first part dicusses topics in parallel programming languages; in particular: early work on simple language extensions for concurrency; simple extensions for message passing; programming with tuples; message passing for parallel architectures; data parallel programming.

The second part of the unit discusses languages for modelling and solving constraint and optimization problems. This part will detail methods and algorithms used in their implementation, i.e. algorithms for constraint solving and linear optimization, as well as programming techniques with such languages. We will particularly look at OPL (the Optimization Programming Language) and at the CLP paradigm (Constraint Logic Programming).

The unit covers the programming-oriented aspects of CSE433 and CSE444.

6.3  CSE 447 Security Concepts

Graham Farr and Tony Kerr

Prohibitions: CSE 4892 and CSE 425

This units provides a broad introduction to security issues in information systems. The first part of the unit covers general issues in infomration security, such as physical security; network security; software security; contingency planning; legal issues; management issues.

The second part complements this with selected introductory issues in cryptography: In particular elementary secret-key cryptosystems (transposition, substitution, polyalphabetic, etc.), basic principles of building and combining them, a modern secret-key cryptosystem such as the Data Encryption Standard, one-way functions and public-key cryptosystems, trapdoor functions, relevant notions from computational complexity, specific systems including: Diffie-Hellman key exchange scheme, RSA, ElGamal. Comparison of secret- and public-key cryptography.

This unit is a reduced version of CSE425+CSE4892 and is suitable for students who want to achieve a broad understanding of issues in information security, but would also like to cover several other topics in their coursework.

6.4  CSE 415 Modelling, Animating and Rendering: Advanced Topics in Graphics

Alan Dorin and Jon McCormack

Prohibitions: CSE 445.

The first half of this course deals with image synthesis, in particular state-of-the-art methods for achieving high levels of photorealism in computer graphics. Techniques and algorithms discussed include: rendering pipeline overview, scan-line algorithms, ray-casting and ray-tracing, radiosity, photon mapping, texture mapping and synthesis, anti-aliasing techniques and introductory fourier theory. The course also looks at two commercial rendering systems and discusses their applicability to feature film special effects and computer games production.

The second half of the course covers the procedural specification of models for animation, their basic movements and high-level behaviour. Various means of giving Artificial Lifeā to what are essentially sets of numbers are examined. These are utilized in the subject's assignments which provide practical experience in the production of models for computer animation, as well as in the rendering of these models.

6.5  CSE 423 Learning and Prediction

David Dowe and Lloyd Allison

Topics include: elementary information theory (including noiseless coding and Huffman codes); elementary foundations of inductive inference; introduction to Minimum Message Length (MML) inference; MML approaches to clustering, unsupervised classification, decision trees, causal modelling, data mining. Applications to be considered include: image compression, models of protein folding, bushfire prediction, DNA alignment and the human genome project, authorship identification for texts, etc.

6.6  CSE 432 Pattern Recognition and Image Processing

Sid Ray and Peter Tischer

Prohibitions: CSE 445.

One part of the unit provides an introduction to data compression techniques in a wide range of application areas. These areas include universal data compression - a problem domain where minimal assumptions are made about the nature of the data - to areas like image compression and audio compression. Although discussion of image compression techniques is the single largest component of this part of the course, it is not expected that students will have any background in either graphics or image processing. The other part of the unit will discuss pattern recognition methods and their applications in image processing and analysis. Topics include: Introduction to PR Concepts and Methodologies; Pattern Classification Methods; Cluster Analysis; Feature Selection and Extraction; Classification of an Image; Segmentation of Monochrome and Colour Images; and Image Texture Analysis. Fuzzy Sets and Their Application in Pattern Recognition and Image Processing.

6.7  CSE 433 Parallel Systems

Trevor Dix and Ron Pose

Prohibitions: CSE 446.

The unit covers various communication models and languages for parallel programming. Architectures of parallel machines are examined with regard to the efficiency and optimization of programs. The course syllabus covers concurrent, distributed and parallel programming and systems. Topics covered on the programming side include: early work on simple language extensions for concurrency; simple extensions for message passing; programming with tuples; message passing for parallel architectures; data parallel programming; mapping problems to parallel systems; optimization of parallel programs to exploit architectural features. Topics in parallel systems, including machine architectures and operating systems, include: pipelined machines; shared memory machines; distributed memory; SIMD, MIMD; massively parallel machines; special purpose parallel systems.

6.8  CSE 445 Image Synthesis and Image Processing

Jon McCormack and Sid Ray

Prohibitions: CSE 415 and CSE 432.

This unit provides a compact introduction to the two different sides of processing images with computers: the synthesis of images and the analysis of images.

The first half of this course deals with image synthesis, in particular state-of-the-art methods for achieving high levels of photorealism in computer graphics. Techniques and algorithms discussed include: rendering pipeline overview, scan-line algorithms, ray-casting and ray-tracing, radiosity, photon mapping, texture mapping and synthesis, anti-aliasing techniques and introductory fourier theory. The course also looks at two commercial rendering systems and discusses their applicability to feature film special effects and computer games production.

The second part of the unit will discuss pattern recognition methods and their applications in image processing and analysis. Topics include: Introduction to PR Concepts and Methodologies; Pattern Classification Methods; Cluster Analysis; Feature Selection and Extraction; Classification of an Image; Segmentation of Monochrome and Colour Images; and Image Texture Analysis. Fuzzy Sets and Their Application in Pattern Recognition and Image Processing.

This unit is a reduced version of CSE415+CSE432 and is suitable for students who want to achieve a broad understanding of issues in image synthesis and processing, but would also like to cover several other topics in their coursework.

6.9  CSE 4882 Digital Communications Technologies

Chinta Tellembura

Local area networks; metropolitan area networks; satellite networks; ISDN; modem techniques; digital networks.

6.10  CSE 4892 Information Security

Tony Kerr

Prohibitions: CSE 447.

Physical security; network security; software security; contingency planning; legal issues; management issues; audit and review; security applications.

6.11  CSE 5301 Neuro-fuzzy Comupting

Andrew Paplinski, Bin Qiu

Prerequisites: MAT 1811/1812 or MAT 1841/1830 or equivalent, and 2 years or more of study in a computing related course

Theoretical background of fuzzy set, fuzzy logic and neural networks, applications in control, signal processing, image processing and communication networks. Topics include: fuzzy sets, fuzzy arithmetic and relations; fuzzy logic, membership functions; fuzzy inference and fuzzy systems; fuzzy logic controllers and predictors; fuzzy system applications in image processing, pattern recognition, communication networks and other areas; artificial neural network concepts; the perceptron and linear neural networks; multi-layer feedforward neural networks; self-organising systems, competitive learning, self-organising feature maps and recurrent neural networks.

6.12  CSE 5805 Advanced Network Design

Moshe Zukerman

The unit provides mathematical and computing tools required for design and dimensioning of telecommunications networks. Topics include: Network performance modelling and analysis. Queueing models (M/M/1, M/M/k, M/M/k/k, M/G/1), networks of queues. Multi-access systems, routing techniques (shortest path, Bellman-Ford, =Frank-Wolfe, adaptive routing, flooding). Flow control and fairness. Network topology design. Fractal traffic modelling. Mobile network design.

6.13  CSE 425 Cryptography

Graham Farr

Prohibitions: CSE 447.

The subject consists of two parts: a more general introduction to basic concepts in cryptography as a first part and an in-depth discussion of selected cryptographic protocols in the second part.

The first part consists of: Elementary secret-key cryptosystems (transposition, substitution, polyalphabetic, etc.), basic principles of building and combining them, a modern secret-key cryptosystem such as the Data Encryption Standard. One-way functions and public-key cryptosystems, trapdoor functions, relevant notions from computational complexity, specific systems including: Diffie-Hellman key exchange scheme, RSA, ElGamal. Comparison of secret- and public-key cryptography.

The second part covers: Entropy, information, sources, coding: theory and application to elementary secret-key cryptosystems; language as a source; unicity point; perfect secrecy. Cryptographic protocols: authentication (secret- and public-key) and digital signatures; further applications of one-way functions and public-key cryptosystems, such as bit-commitment and relatives; more advanced protocols, e.g. electronic cash, interactive proofs.

6.14  CSE 443 Reasoning under Uncertainty

Ann Nicholson

The first part of the course focuses on two different techniques for modelling and reasoning under uncertainty: Markov Decision Processes and Bayesian (or Belief) networks. The second part provides a discussion of machine learning in the context of Bayesian networks, Markov Decision Processes and other machine learning techniques.

Markov Decision Processes are one way of modelling a stochastic environment. We look at how they can be used for planning using basic solution methods such as dynamic programming, and cover approximation methods that can be used for more complex domains.

Bayesian networks have rapidly become one of the leading technologies for applying AI to real world problems. This follows the work of Pearl, Lauritzen, and others in the late 1980s showing that Bayesian reasoning in practice could be tractable (although in principle it is NP-hard). We begin with a brief examination of the philosophy of Bayesianism, motivating the use of probabilities in decision making, agent modeling and data analysis, and contrasting Bayesian methods with certainty factors, fuzzy logic and the Dempster-Shafer calculus. We introduce Bayesian networks, their inference techniques and approximation methods. We illustrate their use in various applications (robotics and planning, medical decision making, intelligent tutoring, plan recognition, natural language generation and game playing).

There are many difficulties with constructing AI models (such as BNs or MDPs) using human domain knowledge, including lack of human domain expertise, difficulties in elicting causal structure and inconsistent probabilities. This has led to a strong interest in automating the learning of such models from statistical data, which is the focus of the second part of the course.

In the second part of the subject, we begin with an introduction to machine learning. We then look at some of the main machine learning techniques available for learning Bayesian net structures, such as conditional independence learning and statistical methods, including Minimum Message Length inference (MML). We also look at learning MDPs, often called "reinforcement learning" - a computational approach to learning whereby an agent tries to maximise the total amount of reward it receives when interacting with a complex, uncertain environment. Methods covered include Monte Carlo methods and temporal-difference learning.

6.15  CSE 444 Optimization and Constraints

Bernd Meyer and Kim Marriott

Prohibitions: CSE 446.

Optimization and constraint solving is at the core of many extremely important industrial applications, such as timetabling, resource allocation, airline scheduling or fleet coordination. They are also fascinating from a theoretical point of view, because they are instances of computationally hard problems and therefore require specialized techniques to be made tractable. This course discusses the various paradigms and methods that can be used to solve constraint problems and optimization problems.

Topics include:

  1. Characterization and examples of optimization and satisfaction problems.
  2. Complexity of optimization and satisfaction problems.
  3. Overview of techniques for handling intractable problems.
  4. Constraint Solving, Gauss-Jordan.
  5. Linear programming, Simplex, MIP.
  6. Non-linear programming, Euler-Lagrange, quadratic programming.
  7. Stochastic search methods and their origins in nature: Simulated annealing, Taboo Search, Genetic algorithms, Neural networks, Ant colony optimization.
  8. New trends in stochastic optimization.
  9. Constraint satisfaction methods: Backtracking Solver, consistency methods, Boltzman machines.
  10. Modelling languages & tools.

The subject consists of two parts: The first part is oriented towards modelling and programming optimization problems in specialized languages. It details methods and algorithms used in their implementation, i.e. algorithms for constraint solving and linear optimization, as well as programming techniques with such languages. We will particularly look at OPL (the Optimization Programming Language) and at the CLP paradigm (Constraint Logic Programming). The second part of the course discusses advanced methods and algorithms for constraint solving and optimization that are not directly available in such languages. A particular emphasis is on stochastic optimization methods.

6.16  CSE 4884 Network Design and Management

Ken Fletcher

Network strategy development; network design principals; Telecom services; network performance; network topologies; network implementation; case studies.

6.17  CSE 4891 Public telecommunications Networks

Jim Breen

The basic components of the telephone network; principles of exchange operation; long-distance communication; SPC exchanges; digital telephony; digital networks; ISDN.

6.18  CSE 5312 Advanced Digital Design

Andrew Paplinski

Prerequisites: CSE2306 or CSE2102 or equivalent.

Hierarchical structure of digital devices: from gates to processors. The VHDL hardware description language and its application in synthesis and simulation of the digital devices. Behavioural, structural and data-flow specification of the design. Top-down and bottom-up design methodology. The microarchitectural and register-transfer representation levels. Structure of the Mentor Graphics CAD package. Tools for design specification, verification and technology mapping. Selected algorithms for digital design: Multipliers. Random Number Generators. The family of CORDIC algorithms for vector rotations, and elementary functions. FPGA and ASIC.

6.19  CSE 5302 Video Coding and Compression

Tim Ferguson

Prerequisites: MAT 1811/1812 or MAT 1841/1830 or equivalent

Fundamental concepts, theory and techniques of digital video signal coding and compression, waveform characterization and representation; human visual systems and vision modelling; transform coding, performance evaluation; motion compensated video coding techniques; hybrid coding algorithms sub-band and wavelet transform coding; vector quantization; run-length coding; variable-length coding techniques including Huffman, Sannon-Fano and Comma codes; fractal image/video compression; hierarchical coding; filtering in video systems; introduction to industrial coding/compression standards for image/video signals; implementations and applications of digital video coding systems.

6.20  CSE 5803 Advanced Internet Protocols and Applications

Bin Qiu

The role of and the service and protocol standards for the OSI session and presentation layers: the OSI ACSE, RTSE, and ROSE; selected OSI applications. GOSIPs. Selected open non-OSI applications and their relationship to OSI. Implementation of a simple OSI application.


File translated from TEX by TTH, version 2.25.
On 2 Mar 2001, 10:20.