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Last Updated: Wed Jun 11 08:37:49 UTC 2014


Ad Hoc Networks Research
(1996 - 2008)

Radio Frequency Propagation, Radar Datalinking, Routing,
Smart Networks, GNSS Protocols, Network Performance Modelling



Introduction


Graduate Research Degrees and Scholarships Enquiries [PhD Applicants]
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Ad Hoc Networks are self organising, self healing, distributed networks which most often employ wireless transmission techniques. My ongoing research in this area is divided into several domains. The first is airborne ad hoc networking (my doctoral research topic), the second is Suburban Ad Hoc networking and the related topic of Smart Ad Hoc Networks, and the third is in networked military systems.

My research in this area by necessity spans a number of areas of physics, engineering and computer science. These include radiofrequency propagation effects in “radar-like” and urban geometries, antenna parametrisation, satellite navigation support protocols, routing strategies and protocols, and network performance modelling. Related research I have performed includes radar performance modelling and vehicle signature modelling.

Click Here to Access the SAHN Homepage

The Suburban Ad Hoc (Area) Networking group (1996 - 2008) focused its research activities on techniques for implementing Suburban Ad Hoc Networks. These are self organising, quasi-static ad hoc (typically wireless) networks which provide an alternative technology for providing high speed digital connectivity to households, small businesses and distributed campuses. Specific areas of research interest include security, low level routing protocols, access controls and propagation behaviour.





Smart Ad Hoc Networks (2004 - 2008)

Smart Ad Hoc Networks are capable of analysing the radio propagation environment they operate in to optimise performance. This typically requires that the network nodes have positioning capability as well as memory to recall geographically local conditions. GNSS systems are the most affordable approach to providing network nodes with positioning capability.


Airborne Ad Hoc Networks (1996 - 1999)



Airborne Ad Hoc Networks (AAHN) are a form of ad hoc network in which the transceivers and routers are carried by airborne platforms, such as conventional aircraft, High Altitude Long Endurance or conventional Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles, tethered  aerostats or dirigibles. As such the AAHN has many quite different characteristics compared to conventional 'terrestrial' ad hoc networks. While AAHNs offer enormous footprint coverage for each node, compared to conventional solutions, this is achieved at the expense of unique problems in antenna placement, transceiver design, protocol design and integration.

Airborne Ad Hoc Network Primer (1996 - 1999)


Perhaps the best contextual comparison depicting the unique properties of the AAHN is its geometry compared to conventional satcom links. With most aircraft at the tropopause, and some in the stratosphere (UAVs) or lower troposhere, propagation related issues are far more pronounced against satcom systems, while latency is inherently better, especially where the network footprint is relatively modest.

This chart compares latency behaviours for satellite systems. The AAHN at shorter distances experiences latencies which are characteristic of terrestrial networks.

Propagation geometry chart for an AAHN link. The most interesting problems to solve arise in the Loss/Gain limited and Transition regions.


This chart depicts the coverage requirements for an AAHN antenna suite on a conventional aircraft.


Modelling long range link behaviour requires simulation of propagation losses. This plot was produced by the TROPPO simulator and depicts gaseous losses as a function of altitude, using the Van Vleck, Liege and Blake models.


Fine structure of the gaseous loss model in the Oxygen resonance region using the TROPPO simulator.

Gaseous loss rate model parameterised by frequency.

Gasous loss profiles for a link between an aircraft at 11 km altitude and a ground station, separated by a ground track distance of 380 km, using the TROPPO simulation and a nonlinear refracted path model.





Computer Science, Engineering and Systems Publications List Information Warfare, Hypergames, Systems Research Ad Hoc Networking Research Computer Architecture Research - Password Capability Systems Industry Publications Industry Hardware Design Projects Interesting Papers Photo Galleries Biography Email Carlo GOTO Home
Artwork and text 1994 - 2010 Carlo Kopp; All rights reserved.
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