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Last Updated: Mon Mar 3 17:53:33 UTC 2014


Australian Wattlebirds

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Brush Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera) feeding on a Grevillia Banksii in the suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria. Note the blue irises, and the exposed brown and yellow trim on the wing plumage, not frequently seen in images (Sigma AF 100-300mm f/4 EX IF HSM APO on Nikon D7100; 2014 Carlo Kopp).


Mundane as Australian suburbia might be, we often do get interesting visitors.
This multi-part web page contains a selection of recent suburban wildlife pictures of interest.

The Red Wattlebird is a loud native honeyeater, which is highly territorial and aggressive. It is a frequent resident in Melbourne suburbs, but mostly prefers native blossoms, over European flowering trees. The smaller Brush Wattlebird shares most behavioural traits with its larger cousin, which it will fight over access to blossoming trees.

Photographs produced using a Fuji S5600, Fuji S5800, Fuji HS10, Nikon D90 with Nikkor AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED or
Sigma 105mm f/2.8 DG EX Macro, Nikon D7100 with Sigma AF 100-300mm f/4 EX IF HSM APO, and Mamiya 645/1000S with Sekor C 210mm f/4.

Photos and text 1997-2013 Carlo Kopp;



The attractive native Grevillea banksii bush is popular in Australian gardens, and is a favourite with numerous native bird species. This example has fed Brush Wattlebirds, Red Wattlebirds, and a transient  New Holland Honeyeater (Sekor C 45mm f/2.8N on Nikon D800).



The Eucalyptus caesia or Silver Princess is a small gum tree indigenous to the wheatbelt of my home state, Western Australia. It is well suited to suburbia as it is small but grows quickly, but is like many Eucalypts maintenance intensive as its characteristic drooping branches fracture easily.  This example is the red flowering subspecies, at about eight years of age - it has fed Brush Wattlebirds, Red Wattlebirds, and Rainbow Lorikeets (Nikkor AF-D 50mm f/1.8D on Nikon D90).



The Banksia integrifolia or Coast Banksia is indigenous across the southern Australian coastline and thrives even in very poor soils with modest or poor water supply, making it well suited for Melbourne suburbs. The species is available at low cost, grows quickly and its distinctive blossoms are well liked by honeyeaters (Fuji S5800).

Red Wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata)

































































Brush Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera)

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Other Interesting Wildlife Sites

http://www.wildlife-photo.org/







Computer Science, Engineering and Systems Publications List Information Warfare, Hypergames, Systems Research Ad Hoc Networking Research Computer Architecture Research - Password Capability Systems Industry Publications Industry Hardware Design Projects Interesting Papers Photo Galleries Biography Email Carlo GOTO Home
Artwork and text 1994 - 2010 Carlo Kopp; All rights reserved.
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