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Last Updated: Mon Mar 3 17:53:33 UTC 2014


Australian Suburban Wildlife (Page IIB)



Mundane as Australian suburbia might be, we often do get interesting visitors. This multi-part web page contains a selection of recent wildlife pictures of interest, especially bird life, and some typical habitats.

Photos and text 1997-2012 Carlo Kopp; Photographs produced using a Fuji S5600 5.1 MP, Fuji S5800 8.0 MP, Fuji HS10 10.3 MP, Mamiya 645/1000S and Nikon D90.


Noble Park and Keysborough, Victoria

Common Brushtail Possum





The Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a frequent occupant of urban areas and grows to a weight of 4.5 kg, although this example could be larger. These are arboreal foragers which often steal petfood and ravage suburban fruit trees. This species is a frequent victim of electrocution on high voltage lines - I once observed an example fall from from a 7 metre power pole following a large blue discharge and bang, but recover and scurry off when I arrived to bury what I assumed was a deceased beast. The example depicted is also unusual as it has the less common rusty brown face and shoulder colouring (Images 2012 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90 with internal flash).





Another Common Brushtail Possum, photographed on the fence in January, 2013. This example is different in size and coat coloration, compared to the example photographed in 2012 (Images 2013 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90 with internal flash).



A possum raiding the neighbour's yet to ripen nectarines. Possums are accomplished climbers and fruit trees are a favourite target where accessible (Images 2013 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90 with internal flash).


Common House Mouse




An unwanted household visitor, the Mus Musculus or common House Mouse, another globalised pest. This appears to be a juvenile (Images 2012 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90 with internal flash).




Australian Bush Rat





Juvenile Australian Bush Rat. This is an extremely docile species, this tiny example wandered into my flat and allowed itself to be picked up and carried into the backyard, where it waited for me to photograph it (Images 2011 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90).



Rainbow Lorikeet




Rainbow Lorikeet foraging for nectar in a suburban eucalypt tree in Noble Park (Image 2011 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90).



Rainbow Lorikeet foraging for nectar in a suburban eucalypt tree in Noble Park (Image 2011 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90).



Rainbow Lorikeet feeding on a Banksia Integrifolia (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90 03/2012).


Spotted Dove



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Spotted Dove perched on a neighbour's roof. This introduced Asian species seems to be the most common pidgeon in the Yarraman area, and widely regarded to be a pest, albeit an attractive one (Images 2012 Carlo Kopp; Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D ED / D90).

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Above, below, same Dove.

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A pair of Spotted Dove walking on a tiled roof (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



A pair of Spotted Dove perched on a backyard fence.

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Portrait of a Spotted Dove.

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Another portrait of a Spotted Dove.

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A Spotted Dove stretching its wings.

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A Spotted Dove walking across a tin roof (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90).

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A Spotted Dove walking across a tin roof (
Tokina 50-250mm f/4-5.6 ATX MF / D90).



A Spotted Dove walking across a tiled roof (
Sekor C 105-210mm f/4.5 ULD / D90).





An unusual chocolate coloured Spotted Dove, first two images in juvenile plumage (May 2013) without the characteristic spotted collar, the latter in adult plumage (October 2013) with the fully developed collar. The seventh image is a specimen in typical plumage, shot at the same time (October 2013) for comparison (Nikkor AF-S 70-300mm D-ED, Sigma AF 400mm f/5.6 APO / D90).














Australian Crested Pidgeon





The Crested Pidgeon is an Australian species common across most of the continent, and increasing seen in the suburbs of major cities. These attractive birds are very social and mated pairs frequently display affection (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90 March/June 2012).









The Crested Pidgeon is becoming so urbanised, it can be seen in suburban shopping centre carparks. Like the Australian Bronzewing, they have reflective coloured wing feathers, with a interference pattern which is strongly dependent on viewing angle (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90 April 2012).





Indian Mynah




The Indian Mynah is a well established pest in Australian suburbs, frequently displacing less aggressive native species. It is known to propagate mites and other parasites (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011; 18/03/2012).



A juvenile Indian Mynah. Note the short beak and different face colouration.



The Indian Mynah is easily distinguished by its characteristic walk.





The Indian Mynah posing on a TV antenna (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 April, 2012).



The Indian Mynah in flight (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 April, 2012).


Red Wattlebird




The  Red Wattlebird is a large (up to 15 in) and very loud native honeyeater. This superb example sat on a fence long enough to permit multiple images to be captured, a very unusual circumstance given how hyperactive this species usually is (70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



Red Wattlebird (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



Red Wattlebird (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



Red Wattlebird (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



Red Wattlebird (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).



Above, below: a Red Wattlebird feeding on blossoms of the Banksia integrifolia. Lighting conditions were especially poor (HS10 06/2011).





This pair of young specimens paid me a noisy very early morning visit in spring, 1997, and were photographed in return (Mamiya 645/1000s 210 mm  f/4.0  lens; NB poor lighting resulted in narrow field of focus).




Brush Wattlebird





The Brush Wattlebird is a smaller relative of the Red Wattlebird, but no less noisy. Above an example warbling loudly, below feeding and observing (Nikkor 70-300mm D-ED/ D90 08/2011).







Brush Wattlebird feeding on blossoms of the Grevillea banksii (03/2012).



Common Blackbird





The Common Blackbird is an introduced pest in Australia, and is a frequent sight in the suburbs. This is a male with its characteristic black plumage.



A female Common Blackbird with somewhat tatty plumage (Sekor C 300mm f/5.6N ULD / D90).



House Sparrow




The ubiquitous House Sparrow, common throughout Australian suburbia, a truly globalised pest.




Female House Sparrow.




  Male House Sparrow.


Grey Butcherbird



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The Grey Butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus) is an increasingly common sight in Australian suburbs, and is known for its distinctive call. This immaculate and well grown juvenile made a morning visit in September, 2013 (D90 with Sigma AF 400mm f/5.6 APO).

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An immaculate adult Grey Butcherbird posing for the camera in Spring, 2010 (Fuji HS10 October, 2010).






Australian Magpie



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Magpies have always been a common site in suburbia, and like to scavenge left over pet food. This fine example was photographed in late August, 2012 (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90).

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Magpie photographed in June, 2012 (Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D / D90).



This juvenile Magpie, despite being almost adult size, insisted upon being fed by its parents, and was observed being fed (Fuji HS10 November, 2010).



Australian Raven




A murder of Australian Ravens perched on a transformer pole in Noble Park (Fuji HS10 May, 2010).





An Australian Raven in Noble Park. These are intelligent and highly inquisitive birds (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90).







A juvenile Australian Raven perched on a streetlight in Noble Park, in September, 2013 (D90 with Sigma AF 400mm f/5.6 APO).







Above, below: Little Raven perched on a roof in Noble Park. Sekor A 200 mm f/2.8  APO manual focus lens mounted on a Nikon D90 at 450 ISO and 1/1000, using the Legacy2Digital modified adaptor.

Silver Gull





The Silver Gull is a common sight in Australian suburbs, appearing at shopping centres, sports venues and any other areas where a handy snack can be found, often considerable distances from water. While frequently regarded to be a pest, people often overlook the valuable service these birds provide collecting garbage. This is an immature specimen in a shopping centre carpark.





Adult Silver Gull in a shopping centre carpark (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90).







Adult Silver Gull in 20 knot wind at Sandringham (Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6D-ED/ D90).



Rye, Mornington Peninsula, Victoria



Pacific Gull





Pacific Gull juvenile (Larus pacificus) posing for the camera in December, 2010, on the Rye Jetty, Mornington Peninsula (Fuji HS10 December, 2010).





Pacific Gull juvenile (Larus pacificus) portrait (Fuji HS10 December, 2010).


Australian Suburban Wildlife

Other Interesting Wildlife Sites

http://www.wildlife-photo.org/





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